About Hirono Town

この記事は約12分で読めます。

日本語はページ後半です

English

Preface: Typical Japanese country town between satoyama and the sea

Hirono is a typical Japanese country town, consisting of the sea, satoyama, an urban area spreading out on the flat land between them, and a railroad running north-south through the town, several small rivers, and hills. The town has one supermarket, six convenience stores, a surfing spot on the sea, and a thermal power plant and national soccer training center on the outskirts of town. A 20-minute bicycle ride from the seaside embankment takes you to a rural satoyama farming village that looks like something out of the Hayao Miyazaki’s film “My Neighbor Totoro”.

Fukushima City, the prefectural capital, is less than 2 hours away by car, and by train it takes 2 hours and 40 minutes at the earliest by limited express from Hirono Station. It takes 2 hours and 46 minutes to Tokyo Station by limited express “Hitachi” train.

It is difficult to realize when living in large cities such as Tokyo, Yokohama, Nagoya, Kyoto, and Osaka and their metropolitan areas, but such lands are spread all over Japan. They are another and very attractive aspect of Japan.

History of the area

From Archaeological Perspectives

There are many traces of human habitation in the area where Hirono Town is located today.

Earthenware and stone tools dating from the Early Jomon Period (11,500 to 7,000 years ago) to the Early Jomon Period (7,000 to 5,500 years ago) have been excavated at the Uedago 6 Site discovered in Kamikitasago. The Uetago 6 site is located in the satoyama area to the east of the Dokkamegi settlement.

Stone tools from the Paleolithic period, Jomon period earthenware, Yayoi period earthenware, and the remains of a Heian period dwelling and kiln have also been excavated from the Oriki Site in Oriki Aza-Tate. The Oriki site is located on the right bank of the Oriki River, in the hill where Seitokuji Temple is located.

In addition to these, the remains of an early modern ironworks have been found on Okamiyama in the Kamiasamigawa River, and the remains of several medieval castle buildings have been found on the hilltops in the Hirono.

For more information, please visit this website (Japanese only).

Political History

During the Kofun period (3-7th Century), the area was ruled by a rulers called Iwaki-no-kuninomiyatsuko, who belonged to the Yamato royal authority. Later, the administrative districts to which this area belonged changed rapidly, such as Taka-no-kuni, Hitachi-no-kuni, Mutsu-no-kuni, and Iwaki-no-kuni, but from the 8th century, the area was settled as Mutsu-no-kuni, and became Mutsu-no-kuni Iwaki-gun(county).

In 1180, Iwaki-gun was divided into three parts, and the area where Hirono Town is located became Naraha-gun of Mutsu Province. During the Middle Ages (Kamakura Period, Nanbokucho Period, Muromachi Period, and Sengoku Period), the area was under the control of the Iwaki clan. However, after joining the western forces in the Battle of Sekigahara, the Iwaki clan was ousted by the Tokugawa government, and during the Edo period, this area came under the direct control of the Edo shogunate. At the end of the Edo period, in 1851, the villages of Kami-asamigawa and Yusuji became Tako domain territory as punishment for the Tako domain scandal in Katori County, Shimofusa Province. This was apparently meant to confiscate the rich agricultural lands of Katori County and replace them with mountain villages in Naraha County.

During the Meiji Restoration, the name of the administrative district to which it belonged changed frequently, but in 1876 it came under the jurisdiction of Fukushima Prefecture, and in 1879 Naraha-gun, Fukushima Prefecture, was established.

In 1889, Hirono Village was established, and in 1940 it became Hirono Town.

Industries

The largest industries are the Hirono Thermal Power Plant of Tokyo Electric Power Company and factories located in the industrial park in the northern part of town. Agriculture is dominated by dual-income farmers who grow a combination of rice, vegetables, and livestock.

The town also prospered as a post town on the Rikuzenhama-kaido highway that ran from Senju to Iwanuma until 1898, when a railroad line was opened from Tabata Station in Tokyo to Iwanuma Station in Miyagi Prefecture.

Hironomachi Landscape

Photographer: Yusuke Aoki, All Rights Reserved.

日本語

広野町について

広野町は海と里山、その間の平地に広がる市街地、そして町を南北に縦断する鉄道、いくつかの小さな川と丘からなる、日本の典型的な田舎町です。町にはスーパーマーケットが1軒、コンビニエンスストアが6軒、海にはサーフスポットがあり、町外れには火力発電所とサッカーのナショナルトレーニングセンターがあります。海沿いの堤防から自転車で20分も走れば、「となりのトトロ」に出てくるような里山の農村風景を見ることが出来ます。

県庁所在地の福島市までは自動車で2時間弱、電車では特急で早くても2時間40分かかります。東京駅までは特急ひたちで2時間46分です。

東京や横浜、名古屋、京都、大阪などの大都市やその都市圏で生活しているとなかなか実感を持ちづらいのですが、こうした土地は日本全国に広がっています。大都市やその近郊とは違う、もう一つの日本の、そしてとても魅力的な姿です。

考古学から見た広野町

現在広野町がある場所は古くから人が住んだ痕跡があり、広野町大字上北迫字上田郷で発見された上田郷6遺跡では縄文時代早期(11500年前から7000年前)から前期(7000年前から5500年前)にかけての土器や石器が出土しています。上田郷6遺跡は土ケ目木集落の東側の里山の辺りです。

また広野町折木字館の折木遺跡からは旧石器時代の石器、縄文時代の土器、弥生時代の土器、平安時代の住居跡や窯跡などが出土しています。折木遺跡は折木川の右岸、成徳寺のある丘の中にあります(詳しくは教育委員会に確認してください。また現地踏査は危険なので充分な準備が必要です)。

これらの他にも上浅見川の狼山では近世の製鉄跡が見つかっていますし、丘の上には幾つもの中世の城館の跡が見つかっています。

詳しくはこちらのウェブサイトで検索してください(日本語のみ)。

古代から近代まで

この地域は古墳時代にはヤマト王権に属しており、石城国造(いわきのくにのみやつこ)と呼ばれる肩書の人々がこの地域を支配していました。その後、この地域は多珂国、常陸国、陸奥国、石城国など所属する行政区域が目まぐるしく変わりますが、8世紀から陸奥国として落ち着き、陸奥国磐城郡(むつのくにいわきぐん)となります。

1180年に磐城郡は三分割され、広野町のある地域は楢葉郡(ならはぐん)となりました。陸奥国楢葉郡です。中世(鎌倉時代、南北朝時代、室町時代、戦国時代)には楢葉郡は平家の末裔を称する豪族の岩城氏の支配下にありました。しかし岩城氏は関ヶ原の戦いで西軍についたため徳川政権によって追放され、江戸時代にはこの地域は江戸幕府の直轄領となりました。なお、江戸時代の終盤1851年には下総国香取郡の多古藩のスキャンダルへの処罰として、上浅見川村と夕筋村が多古藩領となっています。これは香取郡の豊かな農地を没収して楢葉郡の山村と領地を入れ替えるという意味合いがあったようです。

明治維新の際にも所属する行政区域名が頻繁に入れ替わりますが、1876年に福島県の管轄となり、1879年に福島県楢葉郡が成立しました。

1889年には広野村が発足し、1940年に広野町となりました。

産業

東京電力の広野火力発電所や町の北部の工業団地に立地する工場が最大の産業です。

農業は稲作、野菜、畜産などを組み合わせた農業を行っている兼業農家が中心です。

また、1898年に東京の田端駅から宮城県の岩沼駅まで鉄道が開通するまでは、千住から岩沼まで続く陸前浜街道の宿場町としても栄えました。